• New Single-Cell Measurement Techniques Reveal Significant Functional Heterogeneity

  • New Single-Cell Measurement Techniques Reveal Significant Functional Heterogeneity

  • Nanowire array chips for molecular typing of rare trafficking leukocytes with application to neurodegenerative pathology

  • Fan Group

    Our group is focused on exploiting systems biology principles to develop single cell micro/nano-technologies for comprehensive analysis of cellular heterogeneity in human health and disease. The goal is to transform diagnosis and therapy of complex human diseases including cancer, infectious and autoimmune diseases to enable personalized medicine.



Our group is focused on exploiting systems biology principles to develop single cell micro/nano-technologies for comprehensive analysis of cellular heterogeneity in human health and disease. The goal is to transform diagnosis and therapy of complex human diseases including cancer, infectious and autoimmune diseases to enable personalized medicine.



We have 2-3 Postdoctoral Associate positions open in the projects involving the use of single-cell proteomic, transcriptomic, and/or epigenomic analyses for (1) the characterization of CAR-T cells in cancer immunotherapy, (2) the study of tumor-immune interactions in brain or breast cancer, and (3) the study of both non-malignant and malignant hematopoietic diseases for early detection and precision medicine. We are located at the Malone Engineering Center of Yale main campus and the lab has long standing collaborations with researchers from Yale School of Medicine, Dana Farber Cancer Center, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, and University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine to apply our technologies to clinical studies. We encourage candidates, who are highly motivated, collaborative, and passionate about translational research to apply. Expertise in genomics, epigenomics, T cell biology, tumor immunology, or hematopoiesis can fit well. Engineering training in microfluidics is desirable, but not strictly required. Should you be interested, please contact Prof. Fan directly via email (rong.fan at yale.edu) with your CV attached.

Rong Fan, Ph. D

Associate Professor 
Department of Biomedical Engineering 
Yale University 
E.mail: rong (dot) fan (at) yale (dot) edu
Phone: 203-432-9905

Address: Malone Engineering Center
              55 Prospect St. New Haven, CT 06511
Prof. Fan Office: MEC 213
Lab:  MEC 103 
Student office: MEC 103 B, C

Professor Rong Fan received his Ph.D. in Chemistry from the University of California at Berkeley in 2006 where his research in Prof. Peidong Yang's group was focused on single nanotube nanofluidics. After completing his doctorate he joined the Nano-Systems Biology Cancer Center at Caltech working in Prof. James Heath's laboratory where he developed an integrated bar code chip that allows highly multiplexed plasma protein measurement form a finger-prick of blood. He is the recipient of numerous awards including the National Cancer Institute’s Howard Temin Career Transition Award (K99/R00), the Bill&Melinda Gates Fdn’s GCE award, the NSF CAREER Award, and the Packard Fellowship for Science and Engineering.

Our research is currently supported by the National Institutes of Health Common Fund Program, National Cancer Institute PS-OC Program and the IMAT Program, the NIDDK Fibrosis Consortium, the National Science Foundation, and the David & Lucile Packard Foundation.

 

Funding Sources

  •